Notable OBs

The history of the College would be non-existant without the stories of its alumni who were educated and grew up within its walls. It is people who make the College what it is today, and we are proud to share with you a few stories below of what our alumni have achieved throughout the College's 172 year history. 

If you would like to nominate someone as a Notable OB, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The baritone Richard Salter, who has died aged 65, only appeared once on the British operatic stage - in 1986, as Chorebus in The Trojans at Opera North.

Flight Lieutenant William Walker, who has died aged 99, was shot down in his Spitfire during the Battle of Britain and wounded. Late in his life, having become the oldest surviving pilot of the Battle, he wrote poetry in memory of his fellow aircrew.

Born: 1940, Croydon, Film & Television Actor - Nominated by Chris Mitchell (H. 1957-61)

Charles Fraser-Smith (26 January 1904 - 9 November 1992) was an author and one-time missionary who is widely credited as being the inspiration for Ian Fleming's James Bond quartermaster Q. During World War II, Fraser-Smith worked for the Ministry of Supply, fabricating equipment for SOE agents operating in occupied Europe. Prior to the war, Fraser-Smith had worked as a missionary in North Africa. After the war he purchased a dairy farm in Bratton Fleming, Devon, where he died in 1992.

Geoffrey Hett (5 March 1909 – November 1988) was a British fencer.

Ewart Alan Mackintosh (4 March 1893 – 23 November 1917) was a war poet and an officer in the Seaforth Highlanders from December 1914. Mackintosh was killed whilst observing the second day of the second Battle of Cambrai, 21 November 1917. His best poetry has been said to be comparable in quality to that of Rupert Brooke.

John Richardson Mainwaring Simmons (1902-1985), office systems pioneer and company director, was born on 18 March 1902 at 52 Ward Place, Cinnamon Gardens, Colombo, Ceylon, the third child of Sydney Mainwaring Simmons (1870-1955), clerk in holy orders, and his first wife, Beatrice Margaret Reynolds (1869-1907). Died: 1985.

Art

Philip was brought up in Le Havre, France and went to English boarding school at the age of 9. He met Gordon Taylor his first mentor at Brighton College who started him on a lifelong love of architecture and painting and sculpture . He went to Cambridge University to study architecture and quickly transferred to art school graduating from Chelsea School of Art.

Following much encouragement from the music department during her time at Brighton College, Nina now continues to write music for film and television.

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